Sailing a week in the Cyclades

As a good navigator you know that a private boat trip is unlike any other experience. The sensation produced by the breeze and the open sea; freedom to anchor where you want; the security of a good boat and a skipper who you can trust … But there is something that makes magical your trip: the destination. This week, BoatBureau suggests a spectacular trip of a week in the Cyclades islands, in the center of the Aegean.

You’ve heard a thousand times about the peculiarity and the picturesque nature of the Greek archipelago with a circle shape. Hence its name, as its islands lie around the sacred island of Delos, the land of the gods Apollo and Artemis. Ancient geographers considered it as a starting point of between 227 islands; from BoatBureau we suggest a circular itinerary through the islands that we consider most interesting starting from Athens and returning them.

 

DAY 1 – Kea (Ceos)

Sailing to Kea becomes a spectacle for the senses, before starting. The pirate stronghold of s. XIII, as we recall, has several relics of ancient Greece, including the Sanctuary of Apollo and the curious lion carving rock s. VI. The island has 1790 inhabitants scattered around the hills, broken by small valleys of vines and fruit trees, and secluded bays. Highlighting the anchorage of Poleis, Bay Vourkari with small taverns and Nikolaos bay in the port of Korissia, one of the safest in the Mediterranean.

 

DAY 2 – Mykonos

Who has not heard about the island with more nightlife in Greece … The international jet set shows their yachts and stanned skins through its beautiful beaches each season. But there’s more. The city is known as Chora and reportedly projects its spell on those who walk the streets of whitewashed walls and doors and windows dressed in blue. Countless church steeples, domes and centenarians red antlers wind mills complete the overview of the low hill. To finish, a funding by the gulfs which penetrate deep into the lands of the island, as Panormou or the Ornou, is priceless.

 

DAY 3 – Paros

One of the most beautiful places and the most nicest to windsurf. Time always goes for sailing. Among its three bays deep entry into the interior of the island, Parikiá serves as the main marina. “Streets of Parikiá have the harmony of a musical composition,” said Nobel laureate Giorgos Seferis. On the other hand, there is no trip to Paros without a pilgrimage to the Panagiá Ekatontapiliani, a beautiful church that stands proud with its 17 centuries to back. The town of Naoussa served as a shipping dock for marble (Lychnites), with which were built the masterpieces of the most famous Greek temples. And to the east, the flat Marmara bay completes the triangle cove of Paros.

 

DAY 4 – Ios

Ios is the youth, which Myconos is the opulence. The island for the youth becomes the meeting point of boys and girls around the world in summer. Its crystal clear waters and countless bars, cafes, clubs and restaurants, the dazzle with its lively nightlife. The dome of the Hagia Irini (17Ac.) crown the port of Ios in the sheltered bay of Ormos northwest. A steep path leads to the village, white and picturesque, full of stairs and narrow roads, inaccessible to vehicles. A mile beyond, on the hillside, there is the most attractive of the island: the fertile valley of Kato Kampos.

 

DAY 5 – Santorini

There are dozens of reasons why to land on this island, but the most important one is the opportunity to get lost in the towns which are in the cliffs, offering breathtaking views over the submerged volcano. The beaches of black, red or white sand are a real spectacle. Part of the volcanic crater swallowed by the sea are Thira and the small Thiresia and Aspro, and in the center, the Kameni islands were formed later by cones of the volcano itself. The hot springs and gas emissions testify that volcanic activity continues. Do not forget to try their delicious wines and local cuisine!

 

DAY – 6  Milos

Another volcanic island is Milos, with its spectacular rock formations and geological and exceptional turquoise beaches. The port, one of the best in the Mediterranean Sea was created when the gap formed when breaking in a crater in the hole left in the northwestern part. One of his most famous islands is the old pirate hideout Kleftiko. It can boast of rocks eroded by wind and sea only accessible by sea, giving a perfect spot for boaters, swimmers and browsers.

 

The other island you cannot miss in Milos is Sarakiniko, which inherited its name from the Saracen pirates. A majestic landscape of volcanic rocks, clear waters and sun, a lot of sun. Essential detour boat around the island, near the coast, to see the color that make up the edges of the sea, taste traditional food and friendly people to talk to. Recall that the sculpture Venus of Milo belongs to the island of Milos.

 

DAY 7 – Seriphus

Looking for a relaxed atmosphere away from the hustle we will sail to Seriphos, known for its excellent cuisine. Most moorings have become fish farms, but it is easy to find a place to alight. Must-see are the fishing village of Livadi, Taxiarchis Monastery in North and Monte Tourlos of 483 m, the highest point on the island. Since ancient times, Seriphus have been dedicated to the agriculture and the exploitation of the iron through the open mines. A quirky place, no doubt.

 

DAY 8 – Athens

Back in Athens, we cannot miss the capital of Greece, cradle of civilization, for what it’s worth as. Built around the old Acropolis and Mount Lycabettus (299 m), it is easy to be transported to the golden age of ancient Greece when Pericles began building the Parthenon thanks to the gods for his victory over the Persians. Del Monte is believed to be the place where the goddess Athena fell from heaven as a bulwark to defend the city. The plain is covered with bustling suburbs, taverns and shops. A walk in Athens is a return to the foundations of mankind.

 

Smooth sailing and Godspeed!


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